Categories
Interactive Art Physical Visual Communication

Crystalis

Crystalis is a collection of three crystalline forms, taking shape as an interactive sculpture. This project explores traditional print media, namely monoplate or block printing, by applying this millennia-old technique to an output only possible with modern technologies – laser cutting. It is through this exploration of contrasting processes that Crystalis evidences that digital and traditional media can coalesce to result in rich, exciting new possibilities.  

The project was developed in three stages, beginning with the design of patterns in Adobe Illustrator, with each pattern taking inspiration from different iconic patterns seen throughout history, including those from Celtic, Chinese and Native American cultures.

Once finalised, these patterns were laser cut into acrylic sheets, which were then processed as monoplates, following a traditional block printing process. Ink was applied to the plate and then run through a press, transferring ink to sheets sheets of translucent paper.

The final stage involved fabricating the crystalline forms, which were cut from acrylic and assembled using a combination of adhesive and folding, where the acrylic is heated along a seam and folded in place, harding once it cools. The translucent paper, including the printed patterns was adhered to the newly formed crystals. Once complete, each crystal was embedded with an LED and connected to a motion-sensor, which triggers the crystals to blink in a ‘breathing’ pattern when someone moves their hand over them.

The resulting outcome is a delicate, ambient interactive sculpture that responds to movement with a soft and warm ‘breath’ effect, almost like the crystals have their own heartbeat.

Project Details

Name: Crystalis

Year: 2013

Materials: translucent paper, block ink, acrylic, MDF, wire

Software: Adobe Illustrator

Hardware: LEDs, PIR motion sensor, Arduino Uno

Categories
Digital Information Design User Experience Visual Communication

Asbestos, Absent

Asbestos, Absent is a series of infographics that tell a story about how mesothelioma, a cancer commonly associated with asbestos exposure, has impacted the lives of Australians. The series was presented digitally on The Cube, designed specifically to resonate with the target demographic, which predominantly comprised of QUT staff and students.

The project was designed to be read sequentially, with the first design encompassing a map-style infographic. This map details the total number of recorded mesothelioma diagnoses in the two decades from 1980-2000, and translates this figure using an average adult height. When layed across a map, the total distance of these human bodies stretched the distance from the QUT Kelvin Grove campus to Gardens Point campus, and back. A bleak image to picture, but an important message that hopes to raise further awareness of this horrible disease.

The second infographic employs a unique twist on the traditional bar graph and contrasts the 2011 figures of those who were exposed to asbestos in both workplace and non-workplace settings. The main message of this design draws attention to ongoing exposure risks faced in the construction industry as well as highlighting a little-known fact – that spouses of workers were exposed to asbestos simply because they washed their clothing in the same machine.

The final infographic in this series is a set of timelines, contrasting three individuals who were diagnosed with mesothelioma. These timelines were developed from qualitative data, such as news articles and interviews. These reports were examined, where I sought out patterns and commonalities in their stories. The resulting design gives a glimpse into the lives of these three individuals, emphasising the extreme variety in latency between exposure to asbestos fibres and eventually experiencing symptoms of mesothelioma. My hope with this design was to emphasise how important awareness is of the danger asbestos poses.

This project was developed through a combination of data processing in Microsoft Excel, while design was completed in Adobe Illustrator. I hope the outcomes resonate with you and that you find the story told through the work to be both informative and meaningful.

Project Details

Name: Asbestos, Absent

Year: 2013

Software: Adobe Illustrator, Microsoft Excel, Tableau

Awards/accolades

Exhibited publicly on The Cube, QUT.

Categories
Branding Digital Visual Communication

INVENTory Posters

This project responded to a brief for the now defunct INVENTory space, within the QLD Museum, which called for a rebrand to engage new audiences with all that the space had to offer. The INVENTory was a versatile, collaborative space that included a rotating program of interactive, family-friendly activities that were themed around current exhibitions from within the QLD Museum. The project called for a strong, versatile brand identity, which was to be applied to three posters.

My approach to this project was highly experimental, as I sought to convey an aesthetic that captured the audience’s imagination, while encouraging creative expression. The series of posters is comprised of collaged, treated images and evokes a hypercolour, psychedelic sense of style.

The icons at the centre of each image are designed to change, depending on the current program of events taking place within the INVENTory space, which reflects the need for versatility in the design outcomes.

Project Details

Name: INVENTory Posters

Year: 2013

Software: Adobe Photoshop & Illustrator

Hardware: Canon 500D DSLR